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Plagiarism-Proof Assignments

Designing Plagiarism-Proof Assignments

What is a "plagiarism-proof assignment"?

Bloom, L. Z. (2008). Insider writing: Plagiarism-proof assignments. In C. Eisner and M. Vicinus (Eds.), Originality, imitation, and plagiarism : teaching writing in the digital age (pp. 208-218). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015073943162

DeSena, L. H. (2007). Preventing plagiarism: Tips and techniques. Urbana, Ill: National Council of Teachers of English. http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/76897615

Lathrop, A., & Foss, K. (2005). Guiding students from cheating and plagiarism to honesty and integrity: Strategies for change. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited. http://cod.worldcat.org/oclc/60742096


Designing Assignments to Discourage Plagiarism
Alice Robison - Writing Across the Curriculum at UW-Madison

"Teaching our students about proper use of sources and citation methods is an important part of discouraging plagiarism, and defining, discussing, and teaching proper use of sources and citation methods is a useful tactic. Experienced instructors concur that it is important to include information on plagiarism in their syllabi, perhaps confirming class discussions with “academic honesty contracts” or institutional “honor codes.” In addition, instructors can think carefully about course- and assignment-design."


Plagiarism-Proofing Assignments and Assessments
UW-Stout Online Professional Development

"Explore how to deter plagiarism through the careful design of learning activities and assessments. Successful educators share their strategies for creating projects, research papers, and exams that emphasize higher-order thinking."


Deterring Plagiarism
Margaret Procter, University of Toronto

"Knowing how to build personal ideas on past knowledge is a central goal of university study, but it sometimes seems that students hear about it mainly through warnings and threats. Here are some practical ways to lessen the risk of plagiarism in your classes while using writing as a way for students to explore ideas and learn ways of thinking."


Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers
Robert Harris, VirtualSalt

"The availability of textual material in electronic format has made plagiarism easier than ever. Copying and pasting of paragraphs or even entire essays now can be performed with just a few mouse clicks. The strategies discussed here can be used to combat what some believe is an increasing amount of plagiarism on research papers and other student writing. By employing these strategies, you can help encourage students to value the assignment and to do their own work."

Assignments that Work

What makes a good research assignment?
Assignments that work...

  • Communicate the value of inquiry
  • Require application of diverse information seeking strategies
  • Entail topic development
  • Recognize that different types of resources are appropriate for different information needs
  • Expose students to a variety of resources
  • Promote critical evaluation
  • Incorporate ethical considerations of information use
  • Enrich the subject of study
  • Require practice finding and using information for a specific purpose
  • Reinforce information literacy within different disciplines and at different developmental levels

This guide is adapted from Olympic College Library's "Information Literacy Assignments That Work!" and is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0

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Critical Conversations

Post-Election, Some Professors Feel They Must Play Mediator
Chronicle of Higher Education

"Will I put off my students? How will those talks affect course evaluations? Will I stifle conversation? Questions like those are among their concerns ... Worries about tenure and promotion could deter some professors. And for many more, politics isn’t related to the curriculum in a way that makes it a common topic of conversation."

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Alt-Research

AltResearch.pngAlt-Research, a Future of Research series, offers presentations on alternative assignment strategies and templates that can be adapted for classes across disciplines. Sessions will provide practical and creative options for any instructor who is weary of reading lackluster research papers, frustrated with plagiarism, or simply looking to expand their assignment repertoire.

Sessions will be presented as face-to-face workshops or discussions and the Library will compile content into an open online toolkit for instructors.

In addition to attending sessions, we invite you to participate by joining the Alt-Research online classroom at https://app.schoology.com/course/874873070. Please contact Jenn Kelley at kelleyj@cod.edu for the enrollment key.

SafeAssign for Teaching & Learning

Bibliography

  • Dow, G. T. (2015). Do cheaters never prosper? The impact of examples, expertise and cognitive load on cryptomnesia and inadvertent self-plagiarism of creative tasks. Creativity Research Journal, 27(1), 47-57.
  • Elander, J., Pittam, G., Lusher, J., Fox, P., & Payne, N. (2010). Evaluation of an intervention to help students avoid unintentional plagiarism by improving their authorial identity. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(2), 157-171.
  • Ferro, M. J., & Martins, H. F. (2016). Academic plagiarism: yielding to temptation. British Journal of Education, Society & Behavioural Science,13(1), 1-11.
  • Hollins, T. J., Lange, N., Dennis, I., & Longmore, C. A. (2015). Social influences on unconscious plagiarism and anti-plagiarism. Memory, 1-19.
  • Keuskamp, D., & Sliuzas, R. (2007). Plagiarism prevention or detection? The contribution of text-matching software to education about academic integrity. Journal of Academic Language and Learning, 1(1), A91-A99.
  • Reed, S. A. (2015). SafeAssign as a Tool for Student Identification of Potential Plagiarism in an Animal Science Writing Course. Natural Sciences Education, 44(1), 95-100.
  • Vanacker, B. (2011). Returning students’ right to access, choice and notice: a proposed code of ethics for instructors using Turnitin. Ethics and information technology, 13(4), 327-338.

Think Like a Novice

Threshold Concepts in College Research

Do you remember when you learned how to "do" research? At some point, something clicked and you understood the process and could replicate it on demand - you may have even grown to love it!
That moment, when the light bulb goes off is an important part of the transition from "novice" to "master" - you have passed a threshold of understanding that is both transformative and irreversible. In this webinar, we will discuss the threshold concepts that students must be guided over in their own journeys toward information literacy mastery.

Resources

View the Presentation Slides

Bibliography

  • Blackmore, M. (2010). Student engagement with information: applying a threshold concept approach to information literacy development. Paper presented at the 3rd Biennial Threshold Concepts Symposium: Exploring transformative dimensions of threshold concepts. Sydney, Australia 1-2 July, 2010.
  • Cousin, G. (2006). An introduction to threshold concepts. Planet, 17, 4-5.
  • Meyer, J. H. F., & Land, R. (2003). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (1): Linkages to ways of thinking and practising. In C. Rust (Ed.), Improving student learning: Ten years on (pp.1-16). Oxford: Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development.
  • Townsend, L., Brunetti, K., & Hofer, A. R. (2011). Threshold concepts and information literacy. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 11(3), 853.

View the Webinar Recording from 27 April, 2015 (48 minutes):
http://cod.adobeconnect.com/p2kklx5eunv/

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Future of Research Archive

  1. Discussions
  2. Workshops
  3. Webinars

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Outrageous Claims!: Radical Ideas for the Future of Research

What would happen if we stopped teaching students how to find sources? if we abandoned the research paper as we know it? if we stopped worrying about plagiarism? if we didn't require source citations? Let's talk about these thrilling/frightening/challenging ideas and the possibilities for change they represent.
Optional Reading: “Decode Academy” by Barbara Fister
Outrageous Claims Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/Outrageous

Plagiarism-Proof Assignments

This open forum will focus on best-practices for creating assignments that do not allow for student plagiarism. Share your own strategies and adopt successful ideas from your colleagues.
Plagiarism-Proof Assignment Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/Plagiarism

Evidence ≠ Belief

What’s happening in public discussions about vaccination or climate change? Tired of reading research papers where students ignore mountains of evidence in their research papers in order to support their own opinions? This session will examine the recent Pew Report about public perception of science and research. It will also propose strategies to get your students to engage with research materials and —maybe— change their opinion after all.
Optional Reading: Pew Report: Public and Scientists’ Views on Science and Society

Introduction to the New Information Literacy Framework

Join the COD Librarians in a discussion about the New Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education and how we can work together to best help our students understand the importance of being literate about the information ecosystem as we see it now and in the future, what it does to learning, and how best to use and navigate through it.
Optional Reading: ACRL “Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education
Framework Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/Framework

Think Like a Novice: Threshold Concepts in College Research

Do you remember when you learned how to "do" research? At some point, something clicked and you understood the process and could replicate it on demand - you may have even grown to love it!
That moment, when the light bulb goes off is an important part of the transition from "novice" to "master" - you have passed a threshold of understanding that is both transformative and irreversible. In this webinar, we will discuss the threshold concepts that students must be guided over in their own journeys toward information literacy mastery.
Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/novice

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Finding and Using Copyright-free Multimedia

Learn how to find high-quality copyright-free images, video, and audio that can be used freely by educators and students. We’ll also discuss Creative Commons and how it’s revolutionizing the use and reuse of digital media.

Link, Stream, Embed: How to Incorporate Library Resources into Your Blackboard Course

Participants in this session will discover amazing, freely-available articles, videos, images, music and more using the Library’s electronic resources; learn how to provide access to selected content through Blackboard; and get an introduction to copyright in the online classroom.

Creative Commons and Copyright-free Media

Learn how to find high-quality copyright-free images, video, and audio that can be used freely by educators and students. We’ll also discuss Creative Commons and how it’s revolutionizing the use and reuse of digital media.

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MLA 8th Edition: What's New? What's Different?

The 8th edition of the MLA Handbook is out and guess what? The guidelines for documenting sources have changed!
MLA now recommends one universal set of guidelines which can be applied to any source, regardless of the format – book, article, video, even Twitter tweets!
Learn about MLA’s radical new approach to building works-cited list entries before Noodlebib, Purdue OWL and even our own Citing Sources page make the switch from Seventh edition to Eighth. This session covers the new concepts of MLA Core Elements and Containers, plus other significant changes.
Webinar Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/MLA

Think Like a Novice: Threshold Concepts in College Research

Do you remember when you learned how to "do" research? At some point, something clicked and you understood the process and could replicate it on demand - you may have even grown to love it! That moment, when the light bulb goes off is an important part of the transition from "novice" to "master" - you have passed a threshold of understanding that is both transformative and irreversible. In this webinar, we will discuss the threshold concepts that students must be guided over in their own journeys toward information literacy mastery.
Webinar Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/novice

What's Wrong with Wikipedia?

According to a 2012 Pew Research Internet Project study, the top five sources students are likely to consult for research are Google, Wikipedia, YouTube, their peers and Spark Notes. What does data about students' information sources say about their research habits and behavior? This 50 minute session will consider this question and explore classroom and assignment strategies for addressing gaps in student "research" skills.
Optional Reading: “How Teens Do Research in the Digital World
Webinar Resources: http://codlrc.org/IL/Future/Sources

Outrageous Claims Resources

Faculty Toolbox

Alternative Assignments
Assigning the traditional research paper isn't the only way to get your students to meet your course outcomes. Browse through some alternative assignments and unconventional approaches for a few options that can get you and your students out of the term paper doldrums.

Source Evaluation Rubrics
Here are three great examples of source evaluation rubrics:

Bibliography
Fister, B. (2013) Decode academy. Paper presented at LOEX, 3 May 2013. http://homepages.gac.edu/~fister/loex13.pdf

What's Wrong with Wikipedia?

Student Source Selection and Research Behavior

According to a 2012 Pew Research Internet Project study, the top five sources students are likely to consult for research are Google, Wikipedia, YouTube, their peers and Spark Notes. What does data about students' information sources say about their research habits and behavior? This 50 minute session will consider this question and explore classroom and assignment strategies for addressing gaps in student "research" skills.

Resources

View the Presentation Slides

Bibliography

  • Holliday, W. & Rogers, J. (2103). Talking about information literacy: the mediating role of discourse in a college writing classroom. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 13(3) 257-271.
  • Howard, R. M., Serviss, T., & Rodrigue, T. K. (2010). Writing from sources, writing from sentences. Writing & Pedagogy, 2(2) 177-192.
  • Purcell, K., Rainie, L., Heaps, A., Buchanan, J., Friedrich, L., Jacklin, A., et al. (2012). How teens do research in the digital world. Pew Internet & American Life Project.
  • Turnitin.com (n.d.) White paper: What’s wrong with Wikipedia? Evaluating the sources used by students.

View the January 23rd webinar recording:
http://cod.adobeconnect.com/p1m6pwqq3m5/

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